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    Much of the debate over the EU summit centres on what leaders must do to satisfy the markets. John Humphrys questioned Lord Lamont...
    • Bellemadge35 As one of the countless retired people whose Occupational Pension Fund now relies ENTIRELY on it's Investments, then I fully concur with Lord Lamont. Apart from all the people like myself there are many, many retired small investors, who now rely to a certain extent, on their investment income for extra income, no matter how small it may be it is important to them. About time some of the young 'idiots' were ACTUALLY EDUCATED about the role that 'Investments' play in ALL our lives.
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    A description of a typical trip to the markets in Cuba. What you can find and why it takes a long time and effort to source food. ...
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    • planningforlife Good morning, this is Jeremy Deedes of Planning for Life, life and financial planning consultants from Helmsley, North Yorkshire. This is my market perspective for Monday 25th April 2011 Highlight of last week Shortened week, but key points: S&P threatened downgrade of US debt - rising debt, political inability to deal with it Bank of China tightened liquidity by increasing banks required reserves for the fourth time this year Greek debt rescheduling marched inexorably closer Earnings reports turned more favourable after a shaky start last week US housing improved, whilst US manufacturing stalled a little, but is still on an upward trend Apple posted record 2Q revenue of $24.7 billion and record 2Q profits of nearly $6bn on sales of Macs, ipods and ipads. Markets Earnings news lifted markets after the sharp falls at the start of the week: Japan +1% FE +2% Europe +1.5% but UK only managed +.5% US +1.5%% Bottom line Little economic data meant investors could focus on favourable US earnings which pulled the markets up. Companies finding ways of maintaining and improving profits, even if the recovery is still bumpy. Investors became less risk averse, leading to a fall in the US$. This week - market moving events may be a short week this week in the UK, but a mass of market moving data to come this week: FOMC announcement and press conference Bank of Japan meeting Advance estimates of UK and US 1Q GDP PFL Small print Please note that nothing in this commentary should be regarded as advice. Planning for Life cannot be held responsible for the outcome of any action taken based on this commentary if advice has not been sought beforehand. You should contact Planning for Life on 01439 770 105 or through our website, www.planningforlife.org, or your professional advisers, before taking any action relating to your personal finances. Planning for Life is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority; our number is 448184.
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    • planningforlife Good Morning. This is Jeremy Deedes of Planning for Life, life and financial planning consultants from Helmsley, in North Yorkshire. Good Morning. This is my market prospective from Monday, 21 March 2011. Let us look at last week first of all, which is certainly one of the most intense, I think extraordinary and probably the most distressing weeks the world has seen for many years. We saw initially those horrendous pictures of the havoc wreaked by the tsunami in Japan and towards the end of the week, we began to realise that the death toll was going to be in the region of at least 20,000. Far more than the 2,000 odd that has been predicted at the beginning of the week. We saw a near nuclear meltdown. We saw riots in Bahrain. We saw increased violence in Libya culminating in the implementation of the UN no-fly zone towards the end of the week. But on the upside, we saw over the weekend, elections in Egypt and an overwhelming vote in favour of a new constitution and to seeing comments from some of the Egyptians interviewed on the press, on the TV, all talking about the real need to move forward and to start a new life as soon as possible – so that was a real encouragement. It is always easy to reduce these tragedies – well, in the case of Egypt – both these successes as well. It is enormous statistics, but let us not, not, not forget the human cost, the human tragedy behind all these stories – from those people putting their lives at risk by trying to control the nuclear reactor in Japan to all those who have lost loved ones, who are homeless in Japan to those who are suffering from violence in Libya and other parts of the Middle East. I think it is a real shame that the press decided in the middle of the week to concentrate so much on the nuclear story, really treading on people’s fears more than anything else. But that was really at the expense of the real human stories of the tragedy of people who were not affected by the nuclear fallout, but by the tsunami and the earthquake itself. And those all but pushed back to the tail-ender news which I thought was a great shame and probably is indicative of the news industry’s desire to make money out of people’s fears rather than trying to inspire their compassion. Anyway, turning to their economic and financial front, highlights of last week included – well, quite a lot actually – rising oil prices, Moody’s, the debt agency downgraded Portugal’s debt following on from that is Greece and Spain the week before. The OECD reporting to the UK with its low growth. Interim interest rates increased to 6.75% and reserve rates in China has also tightened, both continuing trends to tighten monetary policy in the Far East to combat ever rising inflation. In the US, we saw unexpected strength in US manufacturing sector and industrial sectors which are pending recovery but an ongoing weakness in the housing sector in the US. There is also a growing trend of inflation in the US led by fuel and energy once again, echoing a global trend. US leading indicators make a strong come back which is good, and then again the Fed’s marginal economic upgrade made at the same time as they announced unchanged policy on interest rates and QE. So how did the markets do last week? Well, unsurprisingly they were pretty much down after a very volatile week. We saw Japan down 10%, Asia-Pacific market is down around 2% to 3%, Europe was down about 3%, and US down 2%. But we should not set too much store on these short term movements, they are triggered by short-term events. What we really need to look at is the longer term influence on markets and that at the moment is still very unclear. So the bottom-line, in the US we see manufacturing strength outweighing housing weakness and a recovering financial sector. So the short term for the US is positive. However, in Europe and the Far East, earthquake and the unrest will continue to influence markets – stronger this week, I suspect. But I think last week reinforces two of our Principles of Navigator, which is our 10 Steps to Freedom and an Authentic Life. Principle 3 is plan first, product second and plan any work control. And honestly, so much last week we could not control, but what we can control is our spending, debt, asset allocation, etc. And Principle 8 is asset allocation and on these days, it is important to have a balanced multi-asset class portfolio protected against the macroeconomic risks that we see. Coming up, Japan and Libya which are going to be key drivers of the markets although it was a relatively quiet week for data, but in the UK we see Bank of England meeting minutes, inflation in retail sales, oh yes, and the budget. And before I go, please note that nothing in this commentary should be regarded as advice. Planning for Life cannot be held responsible for the outcome of any action taken based on this commentary if advice has not been sought beforehand. You should contact Planning for Life in 01439 770 105 or through our website, www.planningforlife.org, or your professional advisers, before taking any action relating to your personal finances. Planning for Life is authorized and regulated by the Financial Services Authority; our number is 448184. Thank you very much. Take care.
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    A brief but comprehensive overview of global markets and economies, including a review of last weeks events, market numbers, the bottom...
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    A brief but comprehensive overview of global markets and economies, including a review of last weeks events, market numbers, the bottom...
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    • planningforlife Apologies - figures given for market performance in this commentary are for 2010 to date, not last week. Jeremy Deedes
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    A brief overview of global markets and a discussion about the idiocy of politicians and regulators in both causing and continuing the...
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    A brief but comprehensive overview of global markets and economies, including a review of last weeks events, market numbers, the bottom...